Confronting the Modern Era

Confronting the Modern Age Acknowledgments

“1878 Epidemic.” 29 September 2006. The Great Fever: The American Experience. Public Broadcasting Company. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/fever/peopleevents/e_1878.html

 “1890s in Fashion.” Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1890s_in_fashion

“1900s in Fashion,” Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1900s_in_fashion

“1914-1920: Toward Dress Reform, Fashion History.” Fashion Era. August 2008. http://fashion-era.com/1914_1920_towards_dress_reform2.htm

“100 Years Later, the Food Industry Is Still “The Jungle.” Adam Cohen. 2 January 2007. The New York Times. August 2008. www.nytimes.com/2007/01/02/opinion/02tue4.html

A

“The Adams Papers.” The Massachusetts Historical Society. August 2008. http://www.masshist.org/adams/apmanuscripts/apselected_1_text2.html

An Address to The Men of Tennessee on Female Suffrage. John J. Vertrees. (Nashville, Tennessee: 1916).
 
“Agrarianism and Populism in Tennessee: 1886-1896: An Interpretative Overview.” James Moore. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 42 no. 1 (1983): 76-94.

“Air Travel: Its Impact on the Way We Live and the Way We See Ourselves.” James C. Kruggel. U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission. August 2008. http://webarchive.library.unt.edu/eot2008/20080920050700/http://centennialofflight.gov/essay/Social/impact/SH3.htm

“Alcoa, Tennessee, 1919-1939,” Russell Parker. East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications 48 (1976): 84-103.

“Almira S. Steele and the Steele Home for Needy.” Gary Jenkins. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 48 no. 1 (1989): 29-36.

America Calling: A Social History of the Telephone to 1940. Claude S. Fischer. (Berkely: University of California Press, 1992.)

 “Another Force for Disfranchisement: Blacks and the Prohibitionists in Tennessee.” H. Walton. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 18 no. 1 (1970):728-738.

 “Appalachia Becomes Mainstream: From Down-Home Baseball to the Rookie League in Johnson City, Tennessee.” Marie Tedesco. Journal of East Tennessee History 64 (1992): 20-40.

“Appalachian Exposition of 1910.” Robert Lukens. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=A027
B

 “The Barbarism of the Huns: Family and Community Removal in the Establishment of the Great Smoky Mountains National Park,” Dan Pierce. 57 no. 1 (1998): 62-79.

 “Beale Street.” Bobby Lovett. Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History, Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998.)

“Before There Were Lights: A History of Electricity in the U.S.” Tennessee Valley Authority. August 2008. www.tvakids.com/electricity/history.htm

“Benjamin “Pap” Singleton.” Bobby Lovett. Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998.)

 “Bessie Smith,” Jerry R. Desmond. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998) .

“Bethlehem House.” Carroll Van West. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“The Black Community in a Company Town: Alcoa, Tennessee, 1919-1939.” Russell Parker. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 37 no. 2 (1978): 203-221.

“Black Patch War.” Rick Gregory. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://www.tennesseeencyclopedia.net/entry.php?rec=95

 “Black Pride and Negro Business in the 1920’s: George Washington Lee of Memphis.” David M. Tucker. The Business History Review 43 no. 4 (Winter 1969): 435-451.

“Blacks and Louisiana Constitutional Development, 1890-Present: A Study in Southern Political Thought and Race Relations.” Daniel Brantley. Phylon vol. 48 no. 1 (1st Qtr., 1987): 51-61.

 “Black Women and Music: A Historical Legacy of Struggle.” Angela Davis. African Intellectual Heritage: A Book of Sources. Ed. Molefi Kete Asante and Abu S. Abarry. (Philadelphia: Temple University Press, 1996): 765-777.

“The Birth of the Blues.” Richard Wormser. The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. 2002. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_blues.html

 “Bon Aqua Springs Resort.” Nancy Agent. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008.  http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=B058ab

“Boy Scouts of America.” Dan Pomeroy. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “A Breath of Fresh Air: Segregation, Parks, and Progressivism in Nashville, Tennessee,” Craig Kaplowitz. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 57 no. 2 (1998):132-149.

“The Sessions.” Charles Wolfe. 1987. Birthplace of Country Music Foundation. August 2008. http://www.birthplaceofcountrymusic.org/heritage/bristol-sessions

C

Carrie Chapman Catt Papers, 1916-1921

“A Century of Racial Segregation, 1849-1950.” 24 August 2004. With an Even Hand: Brown vs. Board at Fifty. Library of Congress. August 2008. www.loc.gov/exhibits/brown/brown-segregation.html

 “Camp Fire Girls of America.” Luther Gulick. The New Call of the South: Addresses Delivered at the Southern Sociological Congress, Nashville, Tennessee, May 7 to 10, 1912. Ed. James E. McCulloch. (Nashville: Southern Sociological Congress, 1912).

“Cannon’s Jug Stompers.” People Along the Trail of the Hellhound. April 2001. National Park Service. August 2008. http://www.nps.gov/history/delta/blues/people/people.htm

“Cannon’s Jug Stompers.” December 1996. Roots of the Grateful Dead. August 2008. http://taco.com/roots/memphisjug.html

Change and Continuity: Tennessee Politics since the Civil War. William R. Majors. (Macon: Mercer University Press, 1986).

 “Child Labor and Compulsory Education.” Owen Lovejoy. The New Call of the South: Addresses Delivered at the Southern Sociological Congress, Nashville, Tennessee, May 7 to 10, 1912. Ed. James E. McCulloch. (Nashville: Southern Sociological Congress, 1912) .

 “Child Labor.” Mary Mitchell. Child Welfare in Tennessee: An Inquiry by the National Child Labor Committee for the Tennessee Child Welfare Commission. National Child Labor Committee. Tennessee Child Welfare Commission. (Nashville: State of Tennessee Department of Public Instruction, 1920) .

 “Church of God.” Charles A. Sherrill. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Church of God in Christ.” Randolph Meade Walker. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Church of God of Prophecy.” Charles A. Sherrill. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Class Consciousness and Worker Solidarity in Urban Tennessee: The Chattanooga Carmen’s Strikes of 1899-1917.” James B, Jones. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 52 no. 2 (1993): 98-112.

 “College Football.” John T. Majors & Ann Toplovich. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Commission Government in the Gilded Age: The Memphis Plan,” Lynette Wrenn. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 47 no. 4 (1988): 216-226.

“Conflict and Community: Racial Segregation in a New South City, 1860-1914.” Christopher Caplinger. (Ph.D., Vanderbilt University, 2003).

 “The Control of Child Labor in Tennessee.” Virginia Wood Kuhlman. (M.S., Vanderbilt University. 1951).

 “Conservation.” Ann Toplovich. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Cotton Row to Beale Street: A Business History of Memphis. Robert Sigafoos. (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 1979).

The Creation/Evolution Controversy: A Battle for Cultural Power. Kary Smout. (Westport, CT: Praeger, 1998).

 “Creating Jim Crow.” Ronald Davis. The History of Jim Crow: An Educators Site.  New York Life. August 2008. http://www.jimcrowhistory.org/history/creating.htm

“The Curve Lynchings: Violence, Politics, Economics, and Race Rhetoric in 1890s Memphis.” Lisa White. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 64 no. 1 (2005): 44-61.

D

“David Harrison ‘Uncle Dave’ Macon, 1870-1952.” Caneta Skelley Hankins. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryED=M003

“Deford Bailey.” Charles K. Wolfe. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture, Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998). 

Deford Bailey A Black Star in Early Country. David Morton. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1991).

“Delta Blues and Memphis Blues.” Sean Styles. 30 April 2001. Trail of the HellHound. National Park Service. August 2008. www.nps.gov/history/delta/blues/index.htm

"Democratic Progressivism in Tennessee: The Administrations of Governor Austin peay, 1923-1927." Joseph T. Macpherson. East Tennessee Historical Society Publications 40 (1968): 50-61.

“Department Stores Past.” Whitaker, Jan . Radio Interview. 25 December 2006. American Public Media. August 2008. http://marketplace.publicradio.org/shows/2006/12/25AM200612258.html

The Devil’s Music: A History of the Blues. Giles Oakley. (New York: Taplinger Publishing, 1977).

“Disfranchising Laws.” Connie L. Lester. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Disorderly Women: Gender and Labor Militancy in the Appalachian South.” Jacquelyn Dowd Hall. Journal of American History 73 no. 2 (Sept. 1986): 354-382.

“Duty of the Hour.” Kenneth Goings and Gerald Smith. Trail and Triumph: Essays in Tennessee’s African American History, Ed. Carroll Van West. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002).

E

 “Early Knoxville Radio (1921-41): WNOX and the Midday Merry Go-Round,” Willie Smyth. JEMF Quarterly 28 no. 67-68 (1982): 109-115.

 “Early History of Tennessee’s State Parks.” Allen Coggins. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 43 no. 3 (1984): 295-315.

“The Early History of Overton Park and the Memphis Park System.” John Hopkins. West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 43 (1989): 1-12.
 
 “Early Radio in Broadcasting in Middle Tennessee,” John DeWitt. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 31 no. 1 (1972): 80-94.

“Edward Ward Carmack.” Timothy P. Ezzell, The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Electric consumer appliances proliferate, 1920.” 1998. A Science Odyssey: People and Discoveries. WGBH, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wgbh/aso/databank/entries/dt20ap.html

“Electricity History.” 2008. The Electricity Forum. August 2008. www.electricityforum.com/electricity-history.html
 
“Every Duty Incumbent Upon Them.” Beverly Bond. Trail and Triumph: Essays in Tennessee’s African American History. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002).

“Evolution of the Department Store.” Steven E. Schoenherr. 11 February 2006. History Department, University of San Diego. August 2008. http://history.sandiego.edu/GEN/soc/shoppingcenter4.html

F

Field to Factory: Afro-American Migration, 1915-1940. Spencer Crew. Exhibition catalog. National Museum of American History, Smithsonian Institution. 1987.

“Fine County Road Built By Autoists: Section of Dickerson Turnpike Wins High Praise From Tourists.” Nashville Banner 9 September 1917. pg. 3.

“First Lady Biography: Abigail Adams.” 2005. National First Ladies’ Library. August 2008. http://www.firstladies.org/biographies/firstladies.aspx?biography=2

“Fisk University Student Protests (1925-1927).” Richard Wormser. 2002. The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_fisk.html

  “For Their Exclusive Enjoyment: Racial Politics and the Founding of Douglass Park, Memphis, 1910-1913.” William Frye. West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 47 (1993): 18-36.

“Fraterville Mine Disaster.” Allen Coggins. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008.
http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=F063

“Fraterville Mine Disaster.” 2008. Coal Creek: War and Disasters. Coal Creek Watershed Foundation. August 2008.
http://www.coalcreekaml.com/Legacy4.htm

“From Slave to Caste Society: Penal Changes in Tennessee, 1830-1915.” Randall Sheldon. Tennessee Historical Society 38 no. 4 (1979): 462-478.

G

“General Education Board.” Mary S. Hoffschwelle. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“George Dickel Tennessee Sour Mash Whiskey: The Story Behind the Label,” Kay B. Gaston.  Tennessee Historical Quarterly 57 no. 2 (1998): 150-167.

“George Lafayette Carter.” Martha Egan. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“God Bless You All—I Am Innocent, Sheriff Joseph Shipp, Chattanooga and the Lynching of Ed Johnson.” Michael Webb. Trial and Triumph, Essays in African American History. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 2002).

Goin Back to Memphis: A Century of Blues, Rock ‘n’ Roll, and Glorious Soul. James Dickerson. (New York: Schirmer Books, 1996).

A Good Natured Riot: The Birth of the Grand Ole Opry Charles K. Wolfe. (Nashville: The Country Music Foundation and Vanderbilt University Press, 1999).

“Grace Moore, 1901-1947.” Charles Binnicker. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of Culture and History August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=M119

 Grantland Rice .” 2007. Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grantland_Rice

“The Grand Ole Opry and the Urban South.” Louis M. Kyrakoudes. Southern Culture 10 no. 1 (2004): 67-84.

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History. John M. Barry. (New York: Viking, 2004).

“The Great Migration.” Richard Wormser. 2002. The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_migration.html

 
H

“Happy in the Service of the Lord: Afro-American Gospel Quartets in Memphis, Tennessee.” Christopher Lornell. (Ph.D., Memphis State University, 1983).

“Henry Grantland Rice .” Fred Russell. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=R031

 “Her Sons and Daughters Are Ever on the Altar: Fisk University and the Missionaries to Africa, 1866-1927.” James Quirin. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 60 no. 1 (2001): 16-37.

“Hilary Howse.” Don Doyle. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

In “Historic Highway.” Martha Carver. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“History of Fashion: 1900-1910.” 2007. American Vintage Blues. August 2008. www.vintageblues.com/history_main.htm

“History of Fashion, 1920-1930.” 2007. American Vintage Blues August 2008. www.vintageblues.com/history2.htm

“History of the Telephone.” 24 June 2004. Federal Communications Corporation. August 2008. http://www.fcc.gov/cgb/kidszone/history_telephone.html

I

 “Ida B. Wells.” Miriam DeCosta-Willis. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Ida B. Wells-Barnett: 1862-1931.” Miriam DeCosta-Willis. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia for Culture and History. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=W041 

 “Ida B. Wells-Barnett and Her Passion for Justice.” Lee D. Baker. Ed. Vincent Franklin. Living Our Stories, Telling Our Truths: Autobiography and the Making of African American Intellectual Tradition. (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1995) www.duke.edu/~Idbaker/classes/AAIH/caaih/ibells/ibwbkgrd.html

“The First Wave.” 1999. Influenza: 1918. The American Experience, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/influenza/peopleevents/pandeAMEX86.html

“Invention of the Light Bulb.” Turn of the Century. August 2008. www.ushistory.net/electricity.html
 
“Iroquois (horse).” 2008. Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iroquois_(horse)

J

“James Carroll Napier: National Negro Leader,” Herbert Clark. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 49 no. 4 (1990): 243-252.

“James Vaughn.” The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

”Jimmie Rogers.” Nolan Porterfield. 2006. Encyclopedia of Country Music. The Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum. August 2008. www.countrymusichalloffame.com/site/inductees.aspx?cid=162

 “Joseph Walker.” Ronald A. Walter. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “John Washington Butler.” Jeanette Keith. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “John Vertrees.” Carol Stanford Bucy. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Judge Lynch: His First Hundred Years. Frank Shay. 2008. Google Book Search. August 2008. 

K

“The Keepers and the Kept: The First Hundred Years of the Tennessee Prison System, 1830-1930.” Larry Gossett. (Ph.D. diss., Louisiana State University, 1993).

“Knoxville.” The Encyclopedia America: A Library of Universal Knowledge. (New York: Encyclopedia Americana Corp., 1919).

Knoxville, Tennessee: Continuity and Change in an Appalachian City. Michael McDonald and William B. Wheeler. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1983).

L

Labor,” Joseph Y. Garrison and James B. Jones. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“The Late War in Tennessee.” Harper’s Weekly 8 August 1891. 59.

“Lessons from America’s Tropical Epidemic.” Joseph Shapiro. 2006. National Public Radio. August 2008. www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=19241319

Lewis Hine: Photographs of Child Labor in the New South. John R. Kemp. (Jackson: University of Jackson Press, 1986).

“Lift Tennessee Out of the Mud: Ideology and the good Roads Movement in Tennessee.” Jeanette Keith. Southern Historian 9 (1988): 22-37.

 “Lloyd Branson.” James Hoobler. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Lost Cause of the Confederacy.” 2008. Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lost_Cause_of_the_Confederacy 

The Lost Cause and Civil War History: A Persistent Legacy. Jubal A. Early and Gary Gallagher. Frank L. Klement Lectures. No. 4 (Marquette University Press, 1995).

“Lured into an Ambush: Revenue Officials Killed in Tennessee by Moonshiners.” New York Times 8 October 1892. pg. 1.

“Lynching.” Kathy Bennett. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=L060

“Lynching and Historical Sociology.” Larry Griffin, Paula Clark, and Joanne Sandberg. Under Sentence of Death: Lynching in the South. Ed. W. Fitzhugh Brundage. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1997).

“Lynching in the United States.” 2008. Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynching_in_the_United_States.

M

 “Mail Order.” Mark Wilson. 2004. Encyclopedia of Chicago. August 2008. www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/779.html   

“Main Street Five-and-Dimes: The Architectural Heritage of S.H. Kress & Co.” National Building Museum. www.nbm.org/Exhibits/past/2000_1996Kress_Traveling.html

“Mary Church Terrell (1863-1954).” Roberta Church and Ronald Walter. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. www.tnstate.edu/library/digital/terrell/htm.

“May Cravath Wharton.” Franklin and Betty J. Parker. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Mayor Crump Don’t Like It: Machine Politics in Memphis. G. Wayne Dowdy. (Jackson: University Press of Mississippi, 2006).

 “The Memphis Red Sox Stadium: A Social Institution in Memphis; African American Community.” Kurt McBee. West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 49 (1995): 149-164.

“The Memphis Sewer Experiment.” Lynette Wrenn. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 44 no. 3 (1985):340-349.

“Mining.” James Fickle. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=M104

 “Minor League Baseball.” Marie Tedesco. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Miss Ida B. Wells and Memphis Lynching.” David M. Tucker. Phylon 32 no. 2 (Summer 1971): 112-122.

“Moonshine.” William Ellis. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=M117

“Moonshine.” Megan Dobbs Eades. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Mortality in Tennessee Prisons.” New York Times 22 January 1885. 1.

Memphis During the Progressive Era. William D. Miller. (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 1957).

“Memphis Jug band.” April 2001. People Along the Trail of the Hellhound. National Park Service August 2008. http://www.nps.gov/history/delta/blues/people/people.htm

”Memphis Jug band.” December 1996. Roots of the Grateful Dead. August 2008. http://taco.com/roots/memphisjug.html

Movin’ On: The Great Migration North. Ed. Mitch Yamaski (Carlisle: Discovery Enterprises, 1997).

Mr. Crump of Memphis. William D. Miller. (Kingsport, TN: Louisiana State University Press, 1964).

My Face is Black is True: Callie House and the Struggle for Ex-Slave Reparations. Mary Frances Berry. (New York: Alfred A. Knopf , 2005).

N

“NAACP Founded (1909).” The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. 2002. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_naacp.html

Nashville in the 1890s. Ed. William Waller. (Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1970).

Nashville, 1900 to 1910. Ed. William Waller. (Nashville: Vanderbilt University Press, 1972).

Nashville in the New South, 1880-1930. Don Doyle. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1985).

Nashville Since the 1920s. Don Doyle. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1985).

 “Negro Boycotts of Jim Crow Streetcars in Tennessee.” August Meier and Elliot Rudwick. American Quarterly 21 no. 4 (Winter, 1969): 755-763.

 “Negro Baseball Leagues.” Marie Tedesco. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“A Negro Success Story: James Dallas Burrus.” Joe M. Richardson. The Journal of Negro History 50 no. 4 (October 1965): 274-282.

 “The New South on Display: The Appalachian Expo of 1910 and 1911.” Robert Lukens. Journal of East Tennessee History 69 (1997): 1-28.

A New South Rebellion: The Battle Against Convict Labor in the Tennessee Coalfields, 1871-1896. Karin A. Shapiro. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1998).

Night Riders: Defending Community in the Black Patch, 1890-1915. Christopher Waldrep. (Durham: Duke University Press, 1993).

Night Riders of Reelfoot. Lake Paul J. Vanderwood. (Tuscaloosa: The University of Alabama Press, 2003).

O

“Origins of the Juvenile Court in Memphis, Tennessee: 1900-1910.” Randall Shelden. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 52 no. 1 (1993): 33-43.

“The Overthrow of the Convict Lease System in Tennessee.” C. A. Hutson. Jr. East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications 51 (1979): 92-113.

P

“Percy Warner.” Margaret Binnicker. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=W020 

“The Peabody Education Fund.” Harper’s Weekly 22 November 1890. pg. 902.

“Peabody Fund in Tennessee.” Franklin and Betty J. Parker. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

The Perfect 36: Tennessee Delivers Woman Suffrage. Carol Lynn Yellin and Janann +Sherman+. (Memphis: Wilson Graphics, 1998).

Philander P. Claxton Papers, 1890-1955.

“Philander Priestley Claxton.” Clinton B. Allison. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Primm Springs.” Wish You Were Here: Retreat to Tennessee’s Historic Resorts. 2002. Tennessee Library and Archives. August 2008. www.state.tn.us/tsla/exhibits/tnresorts/spring_histories.htm

“Prohibition: A Case Study of Progressive Reform” in Progressive Era to New Era, 1900-1929.” The Learning Page. January 2004. Library of Congress. August 2008. http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/timeline/progress/prohib/prohib.html

“Prompt Volunteers From Tennessee.” New York Times 9 May 1898. pg. 3.

R

 “A Rare Alliance: African American and White Women in the Tennessee Election of 1919 and 1920.” Anita Shafer Goodstein. The Journal of Southern History 64 no. 2 (May 1998).

“The Realm of a Blues empress: Blues Culture and Bessie Smith in Chattanooga, Tennessee, 1880-1923.” Michelle Scott. (Ph.D., Cornell University, 2002).

Rebuilding the Rural Southern Community: Reformers, Schools, and Homes in Tennessee, 1900-1930. Mary S. Hoffschwelle. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1998).

Recollections of 92 Years: 1824-1916. Elizabeth Avery Meriwether. (McLean, VA: EPM Publications, 1994).

 “Reconstructed, but Unregenerate.” John Crowe Ransom. “I’ll Take My Stand: The South and the Agrarian Tradition. Twelve Southerners. (New York: Harper and Brothers, 1930).

“Red Boiling Springs.” 2008. Wikipedia. August 2008. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Red_Boiling_Springs,_Tennessee

“Reforming Their World: Women in the Progressive Era.” 2007. The National Women’s History Museum. August 2008.
www.nwhm.org/ProgressiveEra/introclubwomen.html

Religion in Tennessee: 1777-1945. Herman A. Norton. Tennessee Historical Commission. (Knoxville: University of Tennessee Press, 1981).

“Resisting Jim Crow.” Ronald Davis. The History of Jim Crow. New York Life. August 2008. www.jimcrowhistory.org/home.htm

“Reunion of Confederate Veterans.” New York Times 9 October 1883. pg. 1.

“The Right to Vote.” Rights of the People: Individual Freedom and the Bill of Rights. 2007. U.S. Department of State. August 2008. http://usinfo.state.gov/products/pubs/rightsof/vote.htm

 “The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow–Civil Rights Act of 1875 Declared Unconstitutional.” Richard Wormser. 2002. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service. August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrowstories_events_uncivil.html

 “Roark Bradford.” Susan Gordon. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Robert Church Jr.” Ronald A. Walter. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Robert Church Sr.” Ronald A. Walter. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Robert Penn Warren.” Marice Wolfe. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

 “Rugby.” John Egerton. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=R063

“Rural Democrats, Eastern Republicans, and Trade-Offs in Tennessee, 1922-1932.” David Lee. East Tennessee Historical Society’s Publications 48 (1976):104-115.

S

“Achievements in Public Health, 1900-1999: Safer and Healthier Foods.” Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report vol. 48 no. 40 (15 October 1999): 905-913. online version. May 2001. Center for Disease Control. August 2008. http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm4840a1.htm

 “Sara Ward Connelly.” Dee Gee Lester. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“Segregation in the U.S. Government.” The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow. 2002. WNET, Public Broadcasting Service August 2008. www.pbs.org/wnet/jimcrow/stories_events_segregation.html

“Sharecropping.” Robert Tracy McKenzie. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=S026

“The Sisters of St. Mary at Memphis: with the Acts and Sufferings of the Priests and Others Who Were There with Them during the Yellow Fever Season of 1878.” Elizabeth Boggs. Project Canterbury, Anglican History. (New York: 1879, 2001).

The Social Origins of the Urban South: Race, Gender, & Migration in Nashville and Middle Tennessee, 1890-1930. Louis M. Kyriakoudes. (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003).

“The Social Gospel in Tennessee: Mark Allison Matthews.” Dale Soden. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 41 no. 2 (1982): 159-170.

The Souls of Black Folk. W.E.B. Du Bois. (Chicago: A. C. McClurg and Co., 1903.) 2008. Bartelby.com. August 2008. www.bartleby.com/114/4.html

“Spanish American War.” Colin Baxter. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Strangers in High Places: The Story of the Great Smoky Mountains. Michael Frome. (Garden City, N.Y: Doubleday and Company, 1966).

“Strikes and Labor Organization in Tennessee During the Great depression of 1893-1897.” James B. Jones. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 52 no. 4 (1993):256-264.

 “Successes of the Spirit.” Kip Lornell. Tennessee Folklore Society Bulletin 54 no. 4 (1991): 134-138.

“Sue Shelton White.” Betty Sparks Huehls. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=W054

 “Sue Shelton White: The Making of a Radical.” Betty Huehls. West Tennessee Historical Society Papers 48 (1994):24-34.

“Surviving Jim Crow.” Ronald Davis. The History of Jim Crow. New York Life. August 2008. www.jimcrowhistory.org/home.htm

T

“Taking Up the White Man’s Burden: Tennesseans in the Philippine Insurrection, 1899.” Gregory Chapman. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 47 no.1 (1988): 27-40.

“Teaching with Documents: Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor.” Development of the Industrial United States. National Archives. August 2008. www.archives.gov/education/lessons/hine-photos/

“Temperance movement.” 2008. Law Library—American Law & Legal Information: American Law Encyclopedia vol. 9. August 2008. http://law.jrank.org/pages/10714/Temperance-Movement.html

“Tennessee.” The Great +Pandemic+ in the United States, 1918-1919. United States Department of Health and Human Services. August 2008. http://1918.-pandemic-flu.gov/your_state/tennessee.htm

Tennessee Strings: The Story of Country Music in Tennessee. Charles K. Wolfe. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1977).

“Tennessee Centennial Exposition.” Don Doyle. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=T026

Tennessee in Turmoil: Politics in the Volunteer State, 1920-1932. David Lee. (Memphis: Memphis State University Press, 1979).

“Tennessee State Prison.” Frank Lee and Robert Rogers. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Tennesseans and Their History. Paul Bergeron, Stephen Ash, and Jeanette Keith.(Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1999).

 “Tennessee’s War of the Roses as Symbol and Myth.” Robert Taylor Jr. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 41 no. 4 (1982):337-359.

“Tennessee Vocational School for Girls.” Paul Harvey. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

Tennesseans at War: Volunteers and Patriots in Defense of Liberty. James A. Crutchfield.  (Nashville: Routledge Hill Press, 1987).

“Tennessee Women and the Vote: Tennessee’s Pivotal Role in the Passage of the Nineteenth Amendment.” Carole Stanford Bucy. August 2008. http://www2.volstate.edu/cbucy/Tennessee%20Materials/suffrageguide.htm

Tennessee Writers. Thomas Daniel Young. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1981).

“That Memorable Meeting: Sam Jones and the Nashville Revival of 1885.” Kathleen Minnix. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 48 no. 3 (1989): 151-161.

“Thoroughbred Horse Breeding and Racing.” Ridley Wills, II. 2002. Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture August 2008. http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=T091

“The Thrill of History Making: Suffrage Memories of Abby Crawford Milton.” Carole Bucy. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 55 no. 3 (1996): 224-239.

“The Trials of Shelby County, Tennessee: Judge Lynch Presiding.” James Sweeney. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 63 no. 2 (2004): 102-127.

The Triumph of Jim Crow: Tennessee Race Relations in the 1880s.
Joseph Cartwright. (Knoxville: The University of Tennessee Press, 1976).

U

“Uneven Condition of Harding Road.” Nashville Banner 9 September 1917. pg. 2.

V

 “The Very Best Influence: Josephine Holloway and Girl Scouting in Nashville’s African American Community.” Elisabeth I. Perry. Tennessee Historical Quarterly 52 no. 2 (1993): 73-85.

 “Virginia Frazier Boyle.” Perre Magness. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998) 82-83.

W

 “W. C. Handy, 1873-1958.” Michael D. Foreman. Franklin County Historical Review 23 no. 1 (1992): 55-60.

“What is Hookworm?” Division of Parasitic Disease. December 2006. Center for Disease Control. August 2008. www.cdc.gov/NCIDOD/dpd/parasites/hookworm/factsht_hookworm.htm

When All the Gods Trembled: Darwinism, Scopes, and American Intellectuals. Paul Conkin. (Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield Publishers, 1998).

When Old Technologies Were New: Thinking about Electric Communication in the Late Nineteenth Century. Carolyn Marvin. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1988).

“Where It Began.” About Us. 2007. Piggly Wiggly Company. August 2008. www.pigglywiggly.com/cgi-bin/customize?aboutus.html

William Christoper W. C. Handy.” Teresa Biddle Davis. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998).

“William Christopher ‘W.C.’ Handy.” People Along the Trail of the HellHound. National Park Service. August 2008. www.nps.gov/history/delta/blues/people/wc_handy.htm

Women’s Christian Temperance Union.” Kristen Lindenmeyer. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. Ed. Carroll Van West. (Nashville: Rutledge Hill Press, 1998). 1073-1074.

“Woman Suffrage.” Anastatia Sims. 2002. The Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture. August 2008.  http://tennesseeencyclopedia.net/imagegallery.php?EntryID=W081

The Woman Suffrage Movement in Tennessee. Elizabeth A. Taylor. (New York: Bookman Associates, 1957).

“The Women’s Christian Temperance Union.” Reforming Their World: Women in the Progressive Era. 2007. The National Women’s History Museum. August 2008. www.nwhm.org/ProgressiveEra/wctu.html

“Working the Black Patch: Tobacco Farming Traditions, 1890-1930.” Register of the Kentucky Historical Society 89 no. 3 (1991): 266-286.

The World’s Most Famous Court Trial: Tennessee Evolution Case: A Complete Stenographic Report of the Famous Court Test of the Tennessee Anti-Evolution Act, at Dayton, July 10 to 21, 1925, including Speeches and Arguments of Attorneys.  John T. Scopes. Suzanne Hall. (Cincinnati: National Book Company, 1925).

Y

“Yellow Fever and Black Policemen in Memphis: A Post Reconstruction Anomaly.” Dennis Rousey. The Journal of Southern History 51 no. 3 (August 1985): 357-374.



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